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The Federalist

THE FEDERALIST  – CURRENT ISSUE

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** The Spring 2016 issue will soon be sent to SHFG members.

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SECOND SERIES, No. 49, Spring 2016

Editor’s Note  — This issue provides a general overview of our recent joint conference with the NCPH, an exciting event that allowed SHFG members to encounter some new issues and initiatives in the broader public history community. We’ve included a few firsthand comments from attendees that provide some idea of the rich programming there. We also list the SHFG award winners and recognize Don Ritchie, Senate Historian Emeritus, as this year’s presenter of the Roger R. Trask Lecture. We’re glad to be able to include the Federal Judicial Center as our featured history office. We learn a great deal here about their valuable role in documenting and explaining our legal heritage. An interview with Richard Stewart, retired chief historian at the Center of Military History, provides a rare view into the focus and production of Army history—its unique records challenges and procedures to achieve high standards. Dr. Stewart also relates his long-term efforts to reform personnel procedures to hire the best historians. Jay Wyatt, of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Congressional History and Education, discusses an ongoing online project that documents and educates us on the work of the remarkable 89th U.S. Congress (1965–66). The project offers insights on the online presentation of primary documents and educational materials for a wide range of audiences and professionals. I thank Chas Downs for another interesting chapter of SHFG history, and A. J. Daverede for reviewing a series of newly declassified records. We hope you enjoy other stories herein that explore the work of federal history programs. Please send any comments and information to me at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org  Twitter: @BenjGuterman

SHFG’s Conference 2016

Tallahassee, FL, federal courthouse, 1936 (National Archives)

Tallahassee, FL, federal courthouse, 1936 (National Archives)

Commemorating the 89th U.S. Congress, Jay Wyatt

President’s Message, Terrance Rucker

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

Promoting History Offices

Trask Lecture, Don Ritchie

SHFG Awards 2016

Office Profile:  The Federal Judicial History Office, Jake Kobrick

History Professional: Interview with Richard W. Stewart, CMH

From the Archives:  SHFG and the A-76 Initiative, Chas Downs

Newly Declassified Records (NDC), A. J. Daverede

U.S. Army Medical Service Corps Resources

K-25 Virtual Museum

Charles D. Melson Retires

Recent Publications, Benjamin Guterman

Making History:  A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar:  Conferences of interest to historians

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WINTER 2015-16, Issue 48

Editor’s Note  — This new year brings an exciting joint annual conference in Baltimore with the National Council on Public History. That rare convergence of federal and nonfederal public historians will undoubtedly offer a great exchange of ideas and information, and wider exposure for what we do as history workers in government. Some of those diverse contributions are again evident in The Federalist. Cynthia C. Kelly recounts the efforts the establish Manhattan Project National Historical Park, which includes three different sites that preserve the history of our early atomic program. The long-term and painstaking efforts required fundraising, coalition building, and new legislation, but the sites were preserved. Tracy Bradford and Amanda Vtipilson discuss the very special mission of the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia. The museum not only features exhibits on the history of women in the U.S. military but, as the authors explain, uses records and artifacts to train and educate enlisted men and women and the general public about that rich history. I thank Justin P. Ebersole for his fascinating interview, which not only provides us a basic entry into NPS archaeological work but demonstrates the professionalism and interdisciplinary complexity of federal historical work at historic sites—of the partnership between archaeologists, historians, curators, and others. Other features include a recap of last fall’s Hewlett Lecture, Chas Downs’s look at past SHFG training programs, a review of newly declassified military records at the National Declassification Center, a look at the USDA’s oral history collection, the NPS’ new Urban Agenda, and brief summaries of exceptional new publications. We hope you enjoy and learn from this issue. Please send news and information to me at benjamin,guterman@shfg.org

Women workers at Gate Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN

Women workers at Gate Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN

Joint SHFG-NCPH Conference 2016

Making of the Manhattan Project Park, Cynthia C. Kelly

President’s Message, Terrance Rucker

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

Hewlett Lecture 2015

Office Profile: U.S. Army Women’s Museum, Tracy Bradford and Amanda Vtipilson

History Professional: Interview with Justin P. Ebersole, National Park Service

From the Archives: SHFG’s Professional Development Seminars, Chas Downs

Oral History Notes: USDA History Collection

NPS’ Urban Agenda

Newly Declassified Records (NDC)

Recent Publications, Benjamin Guterman

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

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FALL 2015, Issue No. 47

Editor’s Note  — This year’s annual Hewlett Lecture takes on special significance with the passing of Richard G. Hewlett, a central figure in the founding of the SHFG. Hewlett was not only a respected federal historian, but one who recognized the historical moment in the late 1970s as a critical time to assert, protect, and advance the unique value of federal historians. Remembering his leadership and contributions inspires us to carry on the work of our organization. In this issue, John Lonnquest and Matthew Pearcy describe the challenges of producing an international history of water conservation with its Dutch counterpart. Nate Jones provides insights and recommendations on declassification work based on his investigations and experiences at the National Security Archive. I thank Don Carter, historian at the Center of Military History, for his interview, which focused on his work on the U.S. Army in postwar Germany. His recent book explores that critical era in great depth, and I recommend it. Gregory Martin of the Naval History and Heritage Command reminds us that the work of federal historians is unique and “purpose-driven,” and that to protect its integrity we can improve how we think about and organize history programs. Christopher Warren provides us with a clear and detailed look at the work of the new history office at Arlington National Cemetery. That program’s organization provides insights into the clear-sightedness and discipline involved in conceiving of and structuring a new program. Other stories provide news about events, programs, and records that we hope you will find useful. As always, these stories show that federal history workers are not only highly talented in producing exceptional historical work, but are ever vigilant about promoting and protecting the value that history brings to their agencies and the public. Please send news and information to me at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org  — Benjamin Guterman

•  In Memoriam: Richard G. Hewlett

As a federal historian he recognized the importance of organizing public historians to promote the effectiveness of their work.

•  ”Writing Comparative History: A Transatlantic Partnership,” John C. Lonnquest and Matthew T. Pearcy

North Holland Canal, completed in 1824

North Holland Canal, completed in 1824

In May 2004, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its Dutch counterpart, the Rijkswaterstaat, signed a memorandum of agreement to promote bilateral collaboration in research, development, testing, and evaluation—all directed at leveraging centuries of expertise and improving the management of water resources in both countries. The two agencies determined to commission a comparative history to explore the geographical, cultural, political, and technical factors that shaped water resource management problems and policies in the United States and the Netherlands. But designing a comparative history was not an easy task.

•  President’s Message, Terrance Rucker

•  Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

•  The Business of History, Gregory J. Martin

“Without this new approach to treating history programs as you might a business, history professionals and resource managers will continue to talk past each other. . . . As history professionals, we need to deploy an increasing body of research and analysis to bolster our arguments that a dedicated history office is actually good business practice.”

•  Office Profile: The Arlington National Cemetery History Office, Christopher A. Warren

“the new ANC leadership; identified, conserved, and secured items of historical significance; created a historical research collection after assessing thousands of linear feet of documentary material; and created a fully functioning Army history office responsive to the needs of the general public and the local command.”

•  History Professional: An Interview with Donald A. Carter

[Forging the Shield is] a history of the U.S. Army rather than a comprehensive study of the Cold War in Europe. However, I think . . . that the presence of the Americans, complete with the logistical infrastructure, raised the stakes of any proposed Soviet incursion to the point where potential losses were unacceptable.”

•  NDC Not Yet “Releasing All It Can,” Nate Jones

“While the NDC has not yet ended “pass/fail review,” soon after the April meeting, the Center took the important step of listing the titles of record series processed for declassification . . . on its website.. . . it is heartening to see one of President Obama’s most important transparency initiatives continue to improve.”

•   From the Archives: Nomination of a New Archivist, Chas Downs

“One of the first crises that faced NARA was the appointment of a new Archivist of the United States after the resignation of Dr. Robert Warner.”

•   Newly Declassified Records

“President Barack Obama presented the documents concerning Brazil in these series to Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff earlier this year.”

•   Oral History: Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, Fred Allison

“The interview project is part of the Great Park History Program, which aims to honor the men and women who served at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) El Toro, near Irvine, California, from 1942 to 1999, and to document the transition from Marine Corps air station to the Orange County Great Park.”

•   Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

•   Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

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SUMMER 2015, Issue No. 46

Editor’s Note

In this issue, we welcome our new officers under the leadership of President Terrance Rucker, and look forward to new ideas and events. The articles in this issue continue to explore and highlight the uniqueness of federal historical duties—reflective of the specialized work that historians and other federal history workers do to fulfill their agencies’ missions. We begin with summaries of our successful spring conference and awards program. The event revealed the many innovative and exciting directions in federal history, from digital history to institutional and military history. See our website for additional images and a video of the Trask Lecture by Victoria A. Harden. Mark L. Howe informs us of his fascinating duties with the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) in its maintenance of boundary markers with Mexico and resolution of water-related issues. I’m thankful to Thomas Wellock, Historian at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, for enlightening us on the highly technical nature of his work and how he serves both the Commission and the public. His discussion reminds us of the increasing importance of public outreach as we try to meet the public’s growing demand for information. Nate Jones, Director of the Freedom of Information Act Project for the National Security Archive, offers an assessment of the declassification work at the National Declassification Center (NDC), with recommendations for greater release of materials in an age of shrinking resources from Congress. Dee Harris and Lori Cox-Paul of the National Archives at Kansas City discuss their new exhibit on district court records related to the garment industry and show how such records broaden our knowledge of local history and of the resources available at facilities of the National Archives. A new column from the NDC highlights specific newly released records series. We continue to feature oral history work, and are interested in news of other projects. Visit us online at www.shfg.org for additional news, recent federal history publications, and to read our blogs. Please contact me with any comments at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

Benjamin Guterman, editor

SHFG Conference at Shepherdstown, WV

John J. Corson as Director of BOASI, circa 1938 (SSA History Archives)

John J. Corson as Director of BOASI, circa 1938 (SSA History Archives)

Victoria Harden Receives the Roger R. Trask Award

President’s Message, Terrance Rucker

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

SHFG Awards 2015

“All Sewn Up,” The Garment Industry in Court Records, Lori Cox-Paul and Dee A. Harris

Office Profile: The U.S. Section, International Boundary and Water Commission, Mark L. Howe

History Professional: Interview with Thomas Wellock, NRC Historian

Oral History Notes: Social Security Administration History Office

From the Archives: The SHFG and National Archives Independence, Chas Downs

Newly Declassified Records

President Truman Mandates a History Program

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

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SPRING 2015,  Issue No. 45

Editor’s Note

The universe of federal history is far larger and more diverse than we might think. This issue of The Federalist continues to explore that diversity and reveal just how innovative federal historians can and must be. First, they must serve the unique missions of their agencies, and that affects not only their duties but their methodologies. Our interview with Marc Rothenberg, retired Historian at the National Science Foundation, provides insights into his editing career and how historians must set office priorities in their work. Richard McCulley, Historian at the Center for Legislative Archives, and a past president of SHFG, provides an excellent overview of the Center and how it serves both Congress and the research public. We see how the Center must observe its own congressionally mandated rules for preservation and access. The National Declassification Center (NDC) is of high interest in our ongoing concern for access to and declassification of the great backlog of unprocessed records at the National Archives. Alex. J. Daverede III, Director of the Center’s Processing and Release Division, provides a clear explanation of the work processes the staff developed to meet that enormous challenge under tight deadlines. The results in declassification have been of enormous benefit to our nation. We look forward to an NDC session at our conference later this month. Greg Bradsher, a senior archivist, at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland, recalls the fight for National Archives independence in 1985. Many historians, both academic and public, joined in that struggle to put records first. It was a clear statement that historical evidence, preserved within a dedicated institution like the Archives, mattered and was central to the maintenance of our political-legal order. We hope you enjoy the other features herein and continue to support SHFG in its varied efforts to champion federal history. Please contact me with any comments at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.—  Benjamin Guterman, editor

The miniature paperback edition of Doctor Zhivago printed by the CIA in 1959.

The miniature paperback edition of Doctor Zhivago printed by the CIA in 1959.

CIA’s Political Warfare with Doctor Zhivago

President’s Message, Carl Ashley

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

National Archives Independence 30 Years Ago, Greg Bradsher

FOIA Matters

Office Profile: The Center for Legislative Archives, Richard McCulley

History Professional: An Interview with Marc Rothenberg

The National Declassification Center: The New Path Forward towards Government Openness, Alex. J. Daverede III

Bureau of Intelligence and Research

Bringing History to Policy Making

From the Archives: The Attempt to Revive the SHFG’s Link with the University of Maryland, Chas Downs

Commentary: Rethinking the Academic–Public History Divide

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

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WINTER 2014-15,  Issue No. 44

Editor’s Note

This issue of The Federalist reminds us again of the diversity and complexity of duties among federal historians and of their contributions to our knowledge of the federal government. Rachel D. Kline, a historian with the Heritage Stewardship Group, USDA Forest Service, reviews work at the “built environment” of Fish Lake Guard Station in the Willamette National Forest in Oregon to understand preservation work in surrounding wilderness areas “untrammeled by man.” James P. Rife of History Associates Incorporated was able to record nearly 30 oral histories from key officers involved in critical transformative work of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in the 1990s and 2000s. Those oral histories help fill important gaps in organizational knowledge left by the absence of documentation, and make possible a new history. An interview with Donna Graves, a private public historian and cultural planner, provides insights into some of the exciting preservation and museum work being done in partnership with local and state preservation offices and the National Park Service. These projects have given voice to underrepresented groups, and their histories and have also produced innovations in oral history work, community involvement, and preservation of historic sites. NASA historian Stephen J. Garber highlights the work and new directions of the NASA History Office Program. It is a progressive, multidimensional program that not only supports the critical decision-making work of NASA leaders, and the work of historians and archivists at the Program and at 10 field centers, but promotes scholarship and public awareness in aerospace history. We hope you enjoy our other stories and news as well, and we welcome your comments and contributions at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

Benjamin Guterman, editor

 

The 1964 Wilderness Act and the Built Environment, Rachel D. Kline

Dispatcher's Cabin (left) and Commissary (both built in 1921) at the Fish Lake Guard Station

Dispatcher’s Cabin (left) and Commissary (both built in 1921) at the Fish Lake Guard Station

Federal Records Act Amended

President’s Message, Carl Ashley

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

The Hewlett Lecture

Oral Histories Key to New VHA History, James P. Rife

The History Professional:  Interview with Donna Graves

History Office Profile:  NASA History Program Office

From the Archives:  SHFG’s University of Maryland Graduate Assistant Program, Chas Downs

FOIA Matters

Intelligence History:  NGA’s Online Resources, Benjamin Guterman

William S. Dudley Honored

NMAH’s 50th Anniversary

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

FALL 2014, Issue 43

Editor’s Note

Several articles in this issue illustrate how federal history workers make important contributions to the successful operation of the federal government. The recent September 17–18 NPS conference offered an exciting and rich exchange of ideas by the very managers and workers nationwide who are responsible for changing that agency. It was an open and democratic event based on the premise that those individuals would return to their sites and innovate. We learn here how historians at the U.S. Marshals play a central role in planning commemoration of that office’s 225th anniversary and helping to inform its future course. An article on Justice Department files held at the National Archives not only highlights the files’ contents but invites historians to seek FOIA access to them. An interview with Richa Wilson provides insights into how architectural evaluation and planning takes place at the U.S. Forest Service. I’m grateful that we can enlighten readers about those historical duties. We also learn how the history office at U.S. Customs and Border Protection helps promote that mission. It’s important that the Department of Homeland Security has reinstated many functions of that history office. We also recall how the SHFG made a contribution to the preservation and expansion of oral history projects in government. Thanks for your support of SHFG through your membership, which enables us to explore such diverse historical contributions. Please send comments to me at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

— Benjamin Guterman, editor

•  Join SHFG and receive THE FEDERALIST

NPS Symposium:  “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces,” Benjamin Guterman

Letter to Justice Department concerning the Emmett Till case, January 1956

Letter to Justice Department concerning the Emmett Till case, January 1956

The Hewlett Lecture:  Anthony S. Pitch

President’s Message, Carl Ashley

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

Department of Justice Case Files:  Civil Rights, Tina L. Ligon

Centennial Commission Promotes WWI Commemoration, Thomas I. Faith

The U.S. Marshals at 225, David S. Turk

From the Archives:  Subcommittee on Oral History, Chas Downs

The History Professional:  Interview with Richa Wilson

Focus on Indian Treaties

History Office Profile:  U.S. Customs and Border Protection, David McKinney

FOIA Matters

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Federalist Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

Summer 2014, Issue 42

Editor’s Note

Welcome to our summer issue. We’ve had good response to our blog post about the closure of the history office at DTRA over two years ago (http://shfg.org/shfg/federal-history-work/military-history-2/). Members have written to clarify and add information to the stories and uncertain fates of other history programs. We’d like to hear more from you about this central issue of the uncertainty at history offices. See our column in this issue. Other articles offer insights into the diverse duties of federal historians. In interpretive work, a multiyear project at the National Museum of the American Indian attempts to rectify the ethnocentric story of Native American history physically enshrined in Post Office murals. In a bit of detective work, we also learn of the NASA history office’s research into and explanation of the famed customs form for the arrival of the Apollo 11 Moon rocks. An interview with FBI Historian John Fox discusses how he completes his unique and often sensitive duties, which include promoting knowledge of crime work and FBI history to the public. We also get a view of the challenging but cutting-edge work of the National Archives’ Electronic Records Division. Other stories point to helpful information for researchers such as new records sources and our online timeline of federal history. Thanks for your support, and please send comments to me at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

— Benjamin Guterman, editor

•  Join SHFG and receive THE FEDERALIST

Indians at the Post Office:  The Smithsonian American Indian Museum Addresses Native Themes in New Deal–Era Murals, Sandra Starr

Osceola in Conference with Hernandez by Eduard Buk Ulreich

Osceola in Conference with Hernandez by Eduard Buk Ulreich

President’s Message, Carl Ashley

Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

Blogs at www.shfg.org

Historians’ Declaration:  Apollo 11 Astronauts Not Subject to Customs Inspection on Return from the Moon, Stephen Garber, David McKinney, and Jennifer Ross-Nazzal

The History Professional:  An Interview with John Fox

A Timeline of Federal History

History Office Profile:  NARA’s Electronic Records Custodial Program: A Decade in review and a Look to the Future, Theodore J. Hull

From the Archives: The Occasional Papers, Chas Downs

Tracking Arctic Climate Changes, Benjamin Guterman

Digital History: The CIA Museum Website, Benjamin Guterman

Sources

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

SPRING 2014, Issue 41

Editor’s Note

The success of our recent annual conference testifies to the vibrancy and relevance of historical programs in the federal government. We were fortunate to hear sessions that assessed current work at the premier programs of the State Department, the National Park Service, and the House and Senate historical offices. We also witnessed the fascinating diversity of current research interests and work, from labor relations to science policies and Cold War-era spies. Charlene Bickford’s Trask Lecture shared recent insights into the critical formative period of presidential-congressional relations in the First Federal Congress, as President Washington and the Senate worked to define “advice and consent” under the new Constitution. Our awards program continues to recognize work that furthers federal history work. See more discussion of the conference inside. Our interview with Samuel Rushay will hopefully give you some idea of the unique duties and work at presidential libraries. Our profile of the Air Force Historical Research Agency reminds us of the vital need to preserve military history and the enormity of that task. Among our others stories, we learn of the new International Research Portal for Holocaust-era records critical for identification of and repatriation of stolen assets of all kinds. This new collective dramatically improves worldwide research in stolen assets and cultural artifacts. We hope you learn from these stories, and we welcome your comments and articles at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org

Benjamin Guterman, editor

• Society Conference in Shepherdstown

Digital publishing panel

Digital publishing panel

• Trask Lecture:  Charlene Bickford

• President’s Message, David McMillen

• Editor’s Note, Benjamin Guterman

• SHFG Awards 2014

• The History Professional:  Interview with Samuel W. Rushay, Jr. of the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

• History Office Profile:  Air Force Historical Research Agency, Mary D. Dysart

• From the Archives:  Directory of Federal Historical Programs and Activities

• International Research Portal

• “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” Exhibit

• FOIA Matters

• Explorations: Investigations in Federal History Work.  Thomas I. Faith, Benjamin Guterman

• Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide

• Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

WINTER 2013-14, Issue 40

•  Editor’s Note

We are all aware that the digital revolution has changed historical work in many ways, but learning how our colleagues are adapting and innovating is invaluable. Beth Luey discusses possible new documentary editing workshops, and in so doing, she clearly identifies many of the advantages and problems for such work made possible by digital capabilities. A report on a recent Rutgers University-Camden forum on “The State of History in the National Parks” notes discussion of the recommendation to NPS for “encouraging flexibility and innovation, including the use of new media.” And Wayne Clough, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, in an ebook reviewed here, discusses the revolutionary and unprecedented impact of the digital world on the core missions of information institutions such as the Smithsonian, the National Archives, and the Library of Congress. This ongoing shift toward providing greater access is steadily redefining federal historical work in profound ways. In other articles, we learn about the range of federal records relating to Puerto Ricans, as well as the work of a Navy historian through an interview with award-winning Jeffrey Barlow, and we take a fascinating look into the Navy’s historic Naval Surface Warfare Center and its preservation of ship models. We hope that you enjoy this issue, and please contact me with any questions or comments at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org

Benjamin Guterman, editor

• Scholarship and Partnerships Forum

Renee Albertoli, Park Ranger and Interpretive Specialist at Independence National Historical Park, makes a point during a small workgroup discussion during the “Scholarship and Partnerships: The State of History in the National Parks” forum held November 6, 2013, at Rutgers-Camden. (Photograph by Julie Roncinske, Rutgers-Camden)

Renee Albertoli, Park Ranger and Interpretive Specialist at Independence National Historical Park, makes a point during a small workgroup discussion during the “Scholarship and Partnerships: The State of History in the National Parks” forum held November 6, 2013, at Rutgers-Camden. (Photograph by Julie Roncinske, Rutgers-Camden)

• Hewlett Lecture: Margo Anderson

• President’s Message, David McMillen

• Editing Documents in the 21st Century, Beth Luey

• Federal Records of Puerto Rico, Dennis Riley

• The History Professional: Interview with Jeffrey G. Barlow

• History Office Profile: The U.S. Navy’s Ship Model Program, Dana Wegner

• From the Archives, Chas Downs

• Explorations: Investigations in federal history work.  Thomas I. Faith, Benjamin Guterman

• Review of Best of Both Worlds, by G. Wayne Clough

• Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide.

• Calendar: Conferences of interest to historians

 

FALL 2013, Issue 39

•  Editor’s Note

Federal history workers bear a special responsibility. They must produce accurate and meaningful interpretations of the past for the public and their agencies. And they must do so amid shrinking resources and demands for more complex, more nuanced narratives. As I reflect on the featured stories in this issue, I’m impressed by these examples of dedication, adaptation, and resourcefulness. Paloma Bolasny explains the National Park Service’s important steps to promote identification and preservation of sites important in U.S. Latino history. That work is critical to rectifying our story of the American past and achieving social and cultural inclusiveness. And the program reaches out and promotes community help toward reaching those goals. Doris A. Hamburg reports on the highly unusual involvement of National Archives preservationists in the rescue of damaged, historic Jewish artifacts in Iraq, an emergency effort that has served both historical and foreign policy goals and called forth the team’s expertise, dedication, and creativity. It is a dramatic story of a state-of-the-art, multidimensional program for protecting cultural heritage in an international setting, set against controversies about the artifacts’ eventual return to Iraq. Rachel Kline describes the work of the Heritage Stewardship Group (HSG) and how it provides a unified, team approach to address the great need for historic preservation and documentation in land-managing agencies. Traveling to sites that lack the resources to accomplish the necessary and complex tasks, the HSG team can efficiently provide all the required skills. We profile here the Historian’s Office of the U.S. Coast Guard and its important work in documenting the history of a vital federal service that dates to the Washington administration. We’re also very grateful for an interview with Victoria A. Harden, former Historian for the National Institutes of Health. We take this opportunity to celebrate her widely honored service to both our organization and the public history community as a whole. We hope you find this issue enlightening. Comments are welcome at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

Benjamin Guterman, editor

NPS American Latino Heritage Initiative, Paloma Bolasny

In Memoriam, Dick Myers

• Preserving the “Iraqi Jewish Archive,” Doris A. Hamburg

Managing Forest Service History, Rachel Kline

The History Professional, An interview with Victoria A. Harden, former Historian of Office of NIH History

FOIA Matters

History Office Profile, U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office, Christopher Havern

From the Archives. Chas Downs looks at SHFG’s Membership Program, 1995

Explorations:  Investigations in federal history work.  Benjamin Guterman, Thomas I. Faith, Mattea Sanders

Making History: A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide.

Federalist Calendar:  Conferences of interest to historians

SUMMER 2013 Articles, Issue 38

• Editor’s Note

We welcome our incoming president, David McMillen and look forward to his leadership for the coming year; his welcoming message is included here. This issue again features a wide-ranging look at federal history work that reflects the diversity of history offices. It starts with Bruce Bustard’s discussion of the current National Archives exhibit on the 1970s DOCUMERICA photography project. Not only has that project been little-known, but it is historically revealing and valuable to contrast it with its earlier model, the Farm Security Administration’s Depression-era project. Max Baumgarten’s work with the Shoah Foundation’s oral history database demonstrates some of the indexing insights and methods we can devise to unlock the wealth of data in such resources. I’m excited to feature our interview with NASA historian Robert Arrighi. His work has allowed us a deeper look into the nation’s impressive flight test facilities during the Cold War and beyond that have produced most of our “revolutionary” technological breakthroughs for jet and rocket engines. The stories are not only ones of remarkable aeronautical advances but of the military basis for our development into a superpower. We also feature a look into the work of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office. Other features hint at some “explorations” or revaluations of historical work, and summarize newly available records. We welcome your submissions and comments to improve The Federalist to me at benjamin.guterman@shfg.org.

Thank you for supporting the SHFG and The Federalist. Please send comments and materials to me at webmaster@shfg.org

Benjamin Guterman, editor

DOCUMERICA Photography Project. Curator Bruce I. Bustard explains the new exhibit at the National Archives.

Organizing Testimonies. Max D. Baumgarten explains his project for maximizing indexing capabilities in oral history collections.

David Hiser’s “The cook at the Texan Cafe watches the snow removal crew at work.” (National Archives 412-DA-10137)

The History Professional, An interview with Robert S. Arrighi, historian at NASA’s Glenn Research Center.

FOIA Matters

History Office Profile, Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Historical Office, by Jon T. Hoffman

From the Archives. Chas Downs looks at SHFG’s successful 1996 Museum Exhibit Standards Committee.

Digital History. Tali Beesley offers three suggestions of online resources.

Records and Research, Exxon Valdez Records. Newly available records.

The Vietnam Cauldron, by Michael B. Petersen, Review by Benjamin Guterman

Explorations. Investigations in federal history work.

Making History. A roundup of news from federal history offices, nationwide.

• Federalist Calendar